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REPUBLIC OF KOREA (SOUTH KOREA)

Summary

The first evaluations of SRI methods in the Republic of Korea were undertaken in 2007 by Dr. Jinyong Choi, professor of sustainable agriculture at Gyeongsang National University (GNU), with thesis research on SRI methods used with a vetch residue-mulched no-till system. During 2011, two related articles on planting densities and nutrient uptake by Vannak Meas and colleagues suggested SRI methods should be useful for small-scale rice farmers in Korea as a sustainable farming system.

During 2011-2012, Dr. Joong-Dae Choi at Kangwon National University presented evidence that SRI methods can reduce water-use, non-point source (NPS) pollution and GHGs under Korean conditions. According to Dr. Choi, conservation of water resources by Korea's agricultural sector is one of the most important pending issues as it consumes nearly half of the nation's water supply and about 90% of agricultural water use is consumed in paddy farming. The research also showed large reductions in methane emissions and only small increases in nitrous oxide, amounting to a net reduction of two-thirds in GHG emissions evaluated in terms of CO2 equivalence (see article and PowerPoint presentation). These findings are especially important since there has been some question as to whether the expected methane reductions with SRI might be offset by significant increases in nitrous oxide, also a potent greenhouse gas. A 2014 technical report in the journal Paddy and Water Environment by Konkuk University researchers that looked at streamflow and total nitrogen and total phosphorus stream water quality data showed that water could be saved and the nutrient load reduced by just applying SRI water management for rice paddies in South Korea.

Progress and Activities

2013-2014 Updates
2011-2012
2007-2009

Research

Videos

PowerPoint Presentations

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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